Tag: program profile

Call for Applications: Program Profile Editor

Posted by – February 16, 2021

Composition Forum, an open access journal of pedagogical theory in rhetoric and composition, is seeking an editor or co-editors for its Program Profiles section. Since 2006, the Program Profiles section of the journal has offered a venue for showcasing exemplary writing programs (broadly conceived) and highlighting the scholarly contribution to our field that such program development and administration demonstrates, including the ways in which theories, research, and pedagogies shape individual writing programs. The Program Profiles editor(s) review program profile submissions and work with authors to prepare program profiles for publication.

Ideal candidates will have expertise in rhetoric and composition studies and experience in writing program scholarship and administration. Institutional support is not required, but it is a plus. Small teams (up to two people) are encouraged to apply.

To apply for the position, send a one-page letter of application outlining your qualifications and vision for Program Profiles to editor Christian Weisser. Specific questions about the position can be sent to current Program Profiles editors Ashley Holmes and Faith Kurtyka.

Review of applications will begin on March 15th, 2021. Learn more about Composition Forum at http://compositionforum.com/

CFP: Undergraduate Writing Majors: Fourteen Program Profiles

Posted by – March 5, 2011

Composition Forum readers who appreciated¬†Lori Ostergaard and Greg A. Giberson’s “Unifying Program Goals: Developing and Implementing a Writing and Rhetoric Major at Oakland University” will be pleased to learn they are editing a collection which continues their research.

Call for Proposals: Undergraduate Writing Majors: Fourteen Program Profiles

Editors: Greg Giberson, Ph.D., Oakland University
Jim Nugent, Ph.D., Oakland University
Lori Ostergaard, Ph.D., Oakland University

During the 2010 CCCC convention, fifteen contributors to What We Are Becoming: Developments in Undergraduate Writing Majors (Utah State University Press, 2010) participated in a roundtable discussion about the growing interest in the writing major. At least sixty people attended the standing-room only session and almost every question posed to the panel was practical in nature, representing some variation of the question “How do we do this?” The proposed collection is conceived as a follow up to What We are Becoming and attempts to answer this very question.

The proposed collection will provide a snapshot of the major through fourteen profiles from various types of institutions (liberal arts, MA, doctoral, etc.), different programs (having varied departmental configurations, sizes, and disciplinary homes), and curricular orientations (such as writing studies, professional/technical writing, new media, creative writing, etc.). The program profiles will:

  • overview the history of the program, institution, department, etc.;¬†describe the program and the rationale for its structure;
  • provide a narrative explaining the local contingencies that helped/hindered the program’s implementation;
  • provide insight into the deliberations, arguments, and comprises that were made in developing the program;
  • include a “Connections” section explaining where the program fits in the university and how it relates to other programs such as first-year composition, WAC, writing centers, etc.;
  • include a “Reflection” section explaining what the author(s) learned about developing, implementing, running, and revising such a program;
  • include a “Looking Forward” section discussing the future of the program; and
  • offer brief supplementary materials as necessary (such as checklists, course descriptions, etc.).

While not an exhaustive list, each chapter should address these aspects of the program thoroughly. While all institutions have their own histories, cultures, and contexts, we believe the knowledge and experiences gathered in this collection will be an indispensable resource for those who find themselves asking “How do we do this?”–whether now or in the years of growth ahead.

The editors seek 500-word proposals for chapters of 5,000 to 7,000 words in length. The deadline for proposals is May 10, 2011. Please email questions and proposals in Microsoft Word or RTF format to: giberso2@oakland.edu.